Missing Ships

November 25, 2008

In 1780, the General Gates went missing. No British warship laid claim to sinking her.
   Long after the American War of Independence, terse entries in marine journals continued to list disappearances. Curiously, many of them are warships. A more mysterious occurrence than a merchant vessel, one might imagine, since they are sturdily built, heavily gunned, and manned by large numbers of well trained crews. In September 1799 U.S.S.
Insurgent vanished, a 36 gun French built warship with 340 crew.  U.S.S. Pickering on a voyage to the West Indies in 1800, around August 20. The U.S.S Wasp, which mercilessly pummeled British shipping in the War of 1812, mysteriously disappeared on a Caribbean cruise in October of 1814. This fate was rather anticlimactic to her last sighting, an engagement with the British brig Atalanta, which she won by capturing the vessel. She then sailed off on her next cruise around September 1 and was never seen again.
   The voyage of the Epervier in 1815 was an auspicious occasion. She carried the peace proposals for the War of 1812. She left Algiers for Norfolk and vanished, delaying the ending of hostilities. Here is one instance where the possible phenomenon of the Bermuda Triangle could have played a crucial role in world politics.
   The U.S.S.
Wildcat, with 31 crew; the schooner Lynx, with 40 men; and the schooner Hornet (which had won a notable victory over HMS Peacock in 1812) all vanished in 1824. Incidentally, the Wildcat vanished after leaving Cuba in October. All of these disappeared in or about the area delineated for the Bermuda Triangle.
   The first recorded merchant ship disappearance was in 1840, when the
Rosalie vanished in the Sargasso Sea. Rosalie has often been listed as a derelict ship instead, confused with the very non mysterious drifter Rossini, and claimed to have never existed at all.  However, the British Maritime Museum does hold a record of her. She was built in 1838, of 222 tons. There is still some debate whether she vanished or was found derelict. The London Times of 1840 listed her as derelict.
   Subsequent mysterious disappearances include another U.S. schooner/warship: Grampas in March of 1843 after sailing south of the Carolinas. The passenger ship City of Glasgow vanished with 400 passengers after she left New York in 1854 en route to Liverpool (taking the southern course). The disappearances of the British training brig HMS Atalanta in 1880 was considered a national catastrophe in Britain. She had departed Bermuda for home, with 290 young cadets and was never seen again. In 1909 the famous world circumnavigator, Joshua Slocum, sailed out of Miami on his treasured yawl Spray, and vanished. He was considered the finest sailor of his time.
  All of these vessels, of course, disappeared in a time when the Atlantic was very big and when many times a ship would be weeks between ports. There is nothing to connect them together except general location.
   By the early 20th century, Marconi’s wireless had proven itself. Warren Tute, in his Atlantic Conquest,  noted that “Wireless telegraphy was to deprive the sea of its ancient terror of silence.” 
   Yet by a strange irony it only gave it a new mystery—the mystery of missing Maydays and SOS signals. All the following vessels vanished while having wireless or radio communications. None left any sound to indicate what happened. The modern terror of the sea turns out to be something more aggravating than silence: a question mark. And all were on voyages that would lead them through the Triangle.   

1917,  between March 6th & 27: the 1,579 gross ton freighter Timandra,
bound for Buenos Aires from Norfolk in cargo of coal. 21 crew under
Captain Lee.

1918, after March 6th– U.S.S. collier Cyclops, after leaving Barbados
 for Baltimore; 309 crew and passengers under Lt. Comm. George
Worley.

1925, December 1: tramp steamer Cotopaxi; 32 crew under Captain Meyers; left Charleston, SC, for Havana, Cuba.

1926, March: freighter Suduffco sailed from New York to Los Angeles
with 4,000 tons of assorted cargo. Never arrived Panama. 29 crew. (Owner unfortunately waited about a month before reporting her overdue)

1938, March: 426-foot, 5,500 ton British freighter Anglo Australian bound from Cardiff, Wales, for British Columbia; 38 crew under Captain Parslow. Last reported herself off the Azores: “Passing Fayal this afternoon. All well.”

1940, February 4: Schooner Gloria Colita, Gulf of Mexico, found derelict and awash.

Losses in the war years cannot be counted, since so many occurred from enemy submarines and mines. Beginning after World War II:

1946, December 5: schooner City Belle, 10 persons, Bahamas, found derelict.

1948, February: 416-foot,  7,219 ton British freighter Samkey reported herself at 41o 48’ N longitude, 24o W latitude on January 31. “All well.” Crew of 43.

1948, March 6: yacht Evelyn K. is found deserted in the Florida Keys; 3 persons missing

1950,  April 5: the 185-foot coaster Sandra, with a cargo of DDT, disappears in passage to Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, from Savannah, Georgia.

1955, January 13: yacht Home Sweet Home, Bermuda to St. Thomas

1955, September 26: yacht Connemara IV found derelict 150 miles southeast of Bermuda.

1956, July: schooner Bounty disappears between Bimini and Miami.

1958, January 1: 44-foot yawl Revonoc vanished between Key West and Miami; 4 crew.

 1960, April 16, yacht Ethel C.,  missing off Virginia

1961, April 5: yacht Callista III, missing Norfolk to Bahamas.

1962, schooner Evangeline

1962, November: Windfall, a  56-foot schooner left Mystic, Conn. for Bermuda; 5 crew.

1963, February 4: the 504-foot T-2 Tanker Marine Sulphur Queen, near Florida Straits; 39 crew.

1963, July 2: fishing vessel Sno Boy, between Kingston to Northeast Cay.

1964: 36-foot ketch Dancing Feathers, en route Bahamas from North Carolina.

1965, January 13: 58-foot Enchantress, 150 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina.

1965, October 28: houseboat El Gato, near Great Inagua, Bahamas.

1967, December 10: Speed Artist 5 persons; Windward Islands

1967, December 22: cabin cruiser Witchcraft, Miami Harbor; 2 persons

1969, July 4: in the Sargasso Sea freighter Cotopaxi sees derelict power yacht on automatic pilot.

1969, July 12: yacht Vagabond found derelict on edge of Sargasso Sea.

1969, August: The 2 light house keepers from Great Isaac’s Rock lighthouse, near Bimini, abandon their posts without reason.

1969, November 2: cabin cruiser Southern Cross found deserted off Cape May.

1971, October 10: 339-foot cargo vessel El Caribe, missing in Caribbean Sea.

1971, October 27: fishing yacht Lucky Edur found derelict of New Jersey; 3

1971, Christmas-time: something annihilates 53-foot yacht Ixtapa, near Florida Keys.

1973, March 21:  541-foot collier s.s. Anita vanished in building hurricane off Norfolk en route to Germany.

1973, March 23: 88-foot yacht Defiance, derelict, near Cap du Mole, St. Nicholas, Haiti; 4

1974, March: 54-foot luxury yacht Saba Bank disappears while cruising Bahamas; 4 crew.

1974, July 24: yacht Dutch Treat,  Miami to Cat Cay, Bahamas.

1975, April 22: 73-foot shrimper Dawn, near Smith Shoals, Key West.

1975, June 24: yacht Meridian, bound to Bermuda from Norfolk.

1975, December 2: ocean going tug Boundless is missing in the Bahamas.

1976, April: motor sailor High Flight disappears between Bimini & Miami

1976, October: the 590-foot ore carrier Sylvia L. Ossa, about 140 miles west of Bermuda; crew of 37.

1976, December 16: 40-foot sloop with 17 people between St. Kitts and Dominica.

1977, November 20: schooner L’Avenir, Maryland to Bermuda.

1979, January 2: 66-foot tug King Co-bra, near Cape Henlopen.

1980, January 12: Sea Quest sends mysterious call, navigational equipment not working. Missing with 11 persons.

1980, April: 43-foot luxury yacht Polymer III, while cruising Bahamas;  2. 

1980, July 26: 38-foot sailboat Kalia III found derelict in the Exumas, Bahamas.

1980, October 26:  the 520-foot s.s. Poet, in cargo of corn, Cape Henlopen, Dl., to Port Said, Egypt.

1982, July 26: American yacht Penetration found deserted north of Sargasso Sea.

1982, August 17: British yacht found deserted in Atlantic.

1983, February 26: 44-foot Sea Lure,  in group of other fishing vessels while headed toward Dry Tortugas. Later found derelict.

1984, November 5\6:  the 32-foot sport fishing boat Real Fine, Freeport to Fort Lauderdale. 3 persons.

1985, February 22: 25-foot pleasure boat with 2 Canadians aboard; Freeport, to West Palm Beach.

1985, May 3: 6 persons disappear in a outboard off Surf City, North Carolina.

1992, October 27: fishing vessel Mae Doris, with 4 crew, south of Cape May.

1995, March 20: Jamanic K., Motor Vessel of 357 gt; Cape Haitien to Miami.

1996, October 14: 65-foot yacht Intrepid, 30 miles off Fort Pierce, FL; 16 missing after quick Mayday.

1997, December:  23-foot Robalo, off Virginia Beach.

1998, January 2: commercial fishing vessel Grumpy found derelict.

1998, May 1: 35-foot converted sport fisher Miss Charlotte hit by force that sucked everything off deck, then sunk; crew survived. Thought to be water spout. Off North Carolina.

1998, August 10: the Erica Lynn.

1998, November:  the Carolina, off Cape May

1998, November:  74-foot Interlude disappeared during cruise to Cayman Islands.

1999, April 15: Miss Fernandina, 85-foot shrimp trawler off Flagler Beach, FL. last signaled: net caught in propellor, electrical drain, listing.

1999, April 23: Motor Vessel Genesis, 196 gt, sailed Port of Spain in cargo of 465 tons brick,  water tanks and concrete slabs; at 5:30 bespoke m/v Survivor. Search for vessel was 33,100 sqm.

1999. August 5:  18-foot day cruiser found derelict except for the dog.  Skipper was on a 2 hour cruise; off North Carolina.

1999, November 15: 2 person in a 22-foot day cruiser between Frying Pan Shoals and Frying Pan Light.

1999,  December 27, Alyson Selene found derelict 7 miles northeast of Andros, Bahamas.

2000, April, freighter Gran Rio R disappears off West Indies.

2000,  August 14, fishing vessel Hemmingway is found deserted; missing crew and captain.

2001,  June 22, 2001, Tropic Bird is found derelict off Antigua.

2002, September 23, freighter Fiona R missing off West Indies en route to St. Vincent.

2003, June 18, Frank and Romina Leone of West Palm Beach, Fl. vanish with their 16 foot boat off Florida.

2003, August 3, alerts go out for sailing yacht Windhome, which left Beaufort, North Carolina for Azores June 24. Overdue and reported missing.

2003, August 25, three men vanish with a 32-foot sleek-go-fast white fiberglass vessel in the Bahamas between Exumas and Mayaguana. Owner identified as Glenroy Carey.

2003, October-November, the fishing boat What’s Left turns up capsized off Cape Canaveral with body of owner aboard. the two other passengers, the Edelmanns are missing. Boat drifted 400 miles without being detected by Coast Guard. Left port in the Gulf for fishing in Florida Keys. 

2003, November 25, Peanuts Too is found deserted south of Bermuda.

2004, March 23, the missing 19-foot fishing boat owned by Glenn Jamison is found by fishing vessel Chummer about 32 miles west of Egmont Key, Florida. No trace is found of Jamison. He had left the previous Sunday for daytime fishing and did not return that night. Coast Guard reports 20 knots winds and 6 foot seas.

2004, December 21, unnamed fishing yola is found abandoned off Puerto Rico, nets deployed and anchored. Fisherman Anibal Matias missing. No trace.

 

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Blackberry Email Can Get Dangerously Addictive

November 21, 2008

Experts have warned the users of Blackberry email devices on its addictive qualities.//

The health experts have warned that the devices could get so addictive that owners might need to be slowly moved away from using them with treatment that is similar to that given to drug users.

The study, which had been carried out by Rutgers University School, in New Jersey, claims that the Blackberry is stimulating a rise in email and internet addiction. They stated that to have found that with the sufferers are able to survive only a few minutes without checking for new mail.

These palm held devices are nicknamed ‘Crackberries’ as it has been found that users quickly become hooked on them, seriously causing damage to their mental health. These gadgets were launched in 1999, and were quickly absorbed by businessmen all over, calling it a lifesaver, as the gadget combined a phone with an access to the internet, thereby giving the owners the means to access their mails anywhere.

Professor Gayle Porter who led the study, while cautioning the users that the effects of becoming addicted to the device can be ‘devastating,’ further stated that, “Employers provide programs to help workers with chemical or substance addictions. Addiction to technology can be equally damaging to a worker’s mental health”

I Love You in different language

November 21, 2008

Ich liebe dich

Rak khun

Ti amo

Sarang heyo

Jet ‘aime

Kocham ciebie

Jag alskar dig

Aishiteru

Seni Seviyorum

Aishiteimasu

Aku cinta kamu

How Many Roses?

November 21, 2008

1 Rose – Love at first sight

2 Roses – Mutual feelings

3 Roses – I love you

7 Roses – I’m infatuated with you

9 Roses – Together as long as we live

10 Roses – You’re perfect

11 Roses – You are my treasured one

12 Roses – Be my steady

13 Roses – Forever friends

15 Roses – I’m really sorry

20 Roses – I’m sincere towards you

21 Roses – I’m committed to you

36 Roses – I’ll remember our romantic moments

40 Roses – My love is genuine

99 Roses – I’ll love you ’till the day I die

100 Roses – I’m totally devoted to you

101 Roses – Your my one and only

108 Roses – Will you marry me?

999 Roses – My love will last ’till the end of time

FLOWERS MEAN?

November 21, 2008

Acacia – Chaste Love

Ambrosia – Your Love is Reciprocated

Daffodil – Your The Only One

Daisy – Innocence

Forget-me-not – True Love

Gardenia – You are Lovely

Ivy – Affection

Lily of the Valley – You’ve Made My Life Complete

Orange Blossom – Eternal Love

Orchid – Beauty

Roses (Single Full Blossom) – I Love You

Tulip – Perfect Lover

Internet Based Tool, BGEM To Help In Study Of Brain Development

November 21, 2008

Researchers interested in studying about brain development can now gain access to an Internet based tool, referred to as the mouse Brain Gene Expression Map (BGEM) //. The credit for world free access to this powerful tool goes to researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

BGEM represents one of the largest gene expression maps, ever developed for a specific organ. The researchers hope that the tool may aid in identification of brain tumor origin at a genetic level, eventually paving way for the development of novel anti-cancer agents that could revolutionize brain cancer treatment.

Scientists would continuously update the BGEM web site. Out of the 25, 000 genes believed to be involved in the development of the nervous system, functional information about 30% of the genes have been deciphered so far. Mutations in these genes have been known to lead to some psychiatric disorders and brain tumors.

The human brain and mouse brain have a number of similarities, making the map crucial in study of human brain development. ‘The BGEM represents a new strategy for exchanging information among researchers that will accelerate our understanding of the human nervous system. I foresee a time when researchers will be able to do certain studies to confirm hypotheses using a computer interface that links our data to many other kinds of gene information, without the need to go into a regular laboratory,’ remarked Dr. Tom Curran, a leading researcher.

The growing, encyclopedia section of BGEM provides a graphic representation of more than thousands of images, as visualized under a microscope. The presence of specialized messenger RNA (mRNA) probes provides adequate information about gene expression and inactivation at each of the four stages of brain development.

These images are linked to the updated information about the genes, their location and function, in addition to the accurate DNA sequence. Scien tific databases such as LocusLink, PubMed, Unigene and Gene Ontology Consortium are providing information for the website.

The Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas (GENSAT), supported by National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS) in turn uses the images. The institution hopes to document the expression of all these genes.

The extensive support from the Bioinformatics Department at St. Jude’s has played a crucial role in the BGEM’s success. Bioinformatics refers to the use of IT gadgets such as computers, software and other technologies to collect, organize, and use huge amounts of biological information.

The software enables online search of scientific databases for latest information on genes that influence gene development. ‘Our ability to link images of gene expression patterns to information on those genes in other databases increases the value of each new gene discovery,’ said Perdeep Mehta, group leader in bioinformatics at St. Jude’s Hartwell Center for Bioinformatics and Biotechnology.

‘A researcher who discovers a previously unrecognized gene that is expressed during brain development can rapidly determine how it fits into the overall scheme of brain development. The BGEM helps researchers skip over much of the drudgery of digging up information from the literature or from other databases,’ commented Dr. Craig Brumwell, the GENSAT manager in St. Jude Developmental Neurobiology.

Now, Dads to Get Text Alerts on How to Raise Their Children

November 21, 2008

Now all those doting dads will be given some tips on how to raise their kids via text messages and e-mails .

The British government is hoping that its 23million pounds scheme of using communication and internet technology to support parents will appeal to fathers, as it makes the use of male-friendly gadgets and technology, such as phones, electronic organisers and instant messaging.

Under the new initiative, “Parent Know-How”, parents will be able to receive SMS and instant messages with information on a range of issues from obesity to bullying to academic performance or seek advice from other parents on social networking sites.

The scheme will also organize existing resources such as websites and telephone help lines.

The newly launched schemes are aimed at fathers and other groups who “may struggle to find the help they need”. These include the parents of disabled children, those living in poor areas and ethnic minority groups.

“We want to support those parents who seek help with bringing up their children. By improving phone-line support and setting up text messages, instant messages and social networks, we will provide help for parents when it suits them best, the Daily Mail quoted Children and Families Minister Kevin Brennan, as saying.

The 23million pounds in funding will be split, with 10.5 million pounds to be spent on improving telephone help-lines and 23 millionpounds going into an innovation fund to encourage support services to find new ways to reach parents.

Missing Ships

November 21, 2008

SEA OF LOST SHIPS

Out there, in the Triangle, is the only true and accurate accounting of missing vessels. Here on shore our files are very incomplete and poor. Most lost vessels are smaller, private craft: yachts, sailboats, schooners and cabin cruisers. Many are suspect of being caused by highjacking. Therefore they cannot warrant detailed investigations. Because they are so common it would be equivalent to the FBI investigating every stolen automobile.
The upshot is that hundreds, perhaps thousands, have vanished and their names will never be known. They are forever in limbo, like an unsolved crime. Part of the purpose of Bermuda-Triangle.Org is to keep a record of these. Neither NTSB or USCG do this. Often people place notices in newspapers or at yacht marinas. If you live in and about the Triangle, take advantage of
In Search of . . . and submit any reliable information on a missing vessel, such as newspaper article, classifieds, or yacht marina bulletin. It may help in locating the vessel. At the very least, it will provide a record of their passing. The following list is compiled from various sources, mostly U.S. Coast Guard bulletins and Lloyd’s List.

The earliest registers list United States warships:

In 1780, the General Gates went missing. No British warship laid claim to sinking her.
Long after the American War of Independence, terse entries in marine journals continued to list disappearances. Curiously, many of them are warships. A more mysterious occurrence than a merchant vessel, one might imagine, since they are sturdily built, heavily gunned, and manned by large numbers of well trained crews. In September 1799 U.S.S.
Insurgent vanished, a 36 gun French built warship with 340 crew. U.S.S. Pickering on a voyage to the West Indies in 1800, around August 20. The U.S.S Wasp, which mercilessly pummeled British shipping in the War of 1812, mysteriously disappeared on a Caribbean cruise in October of 1814. This fate was rather anticlimactic to her last sighting, an engagement with the British brig Atalanta, which she won by capturing the vessel. She then sailed off on her next cruise around September 1 and was never seen again.
The voyage of the Epervier in 1815 was an auspicious occasion. She carried the peace proposals for the War of 1812. She left Algiers for Norfolk and vanished, delaying the ending of hostilities. Here is one instance where the possible phenomenon of the Bermuda Triangle could have played a crucial role in world politics.
The U.S.S.
Wildcat, with 31 crew; the schooner Lynx, with 40 men; and the schooner Hornet (which had won a notable victory over HMS Peacock in 1812) all vanished in 1824. Incidentally, the Wildcat vanished after leaving Cuba in October. All of these disappeared in or about the area delineated for the Bermuda Triangle.
The first recorded merchant ship disappearance was in 1840, when the
Rosalie vanished in the Sargasso Sea. Rosalie has often been listed as a derelict ship instead, confused with the very non mysterious drifter Rossini, and claimed to have never existed at all. However, the British Maritime Museum does hold a record of her. She was built in 1838, of 222 tons. There is still some debate whether she vanished or was found derelict. The London Times of 1840 listed her as derelict.
Subsequent mysterious disappearances include another U.S. schooner/warship: Grampas in March of 1843 after sailing south of the Carolinas. The passenger ship City of Glasgow vanished with 400 passengers after she left New York in 1854 en route to Liverpool (taking the southern course). The disappearances of the British training brig HMS Atalanta in 1880 was considered a national catastrophe in Britain. She had departed Bermuda for home, with 290 young cadets and was never seen again. In 1909 the famous world circumnavigator, Joshua Slocum, sailed out of Miami on his treasured yawl Spray, and vanished. He was considered the finest sailor of his time.
All of these vessels, of course, disappeared in a time when the Atlantic was very big and when many times a ship would be weeks between ports. There is nothing to connect them together except general location.
By the early 20th century, Marconi’s wireless had proven itself. Warren Tute, in his Atlantic Conquest, noted that “Wireless telegraphy was to deprive the sea of its ancient terror of silence.”
Yet by a strange irony it only gave it a new mystery—the mystery of missing Maydays and SOS signals. All the following vessels vanished while having wireless or radio communications. None left any sound to indicate what happened. The modern terror of the sea turns out to be something more aggravating than silence: a question mark. And all were on voyages that would lead them through the Triangle.

1917, between March 6th & 27: the 1,579 gross ton freighter Timandra,
bound for Buenos Aires from Norfolk in cargo of coal. 21 crew under
Captain Lee.

1918, after March 6th– U.S.S. collier Cyclops, after leaving Barbados
for Baltimore; 309 crew and passengers under Lt. Comm. George
Worley.

1925, December 1: tramp steamer Cotopaxi; 32 crew under Captain Meyers; left Charleston, SC, for Havana, Cuba.

1926, March: freighter Suduffco sailed from New York to Los Angeles
with 4,000 tons of assorted cargo. Never arrived Panama. 29 crew. (Owner unfortunately waited about a month before reporting her overdue)

1938, March: 426-foot, 5,500 ton British freighter Anglo Australian bound from Cardiff, Wales, for British Columbia; 38 crew under Captain Parslow. Last reported herself off the Azores: “Passing Fayal this afternoon. All well.”

1940, February 4: Schooner Gloria Colita, Gulf of Mexico, found derelict and awash.

Losses in the war years cannot be counted, since so many occurred from enemy submarines and mines. Beginning after World War II:

1946, December 5: schooner City Belle, 10 persons, Bahamas, found derelict.

1948, February: 416-foot, 7,219 ton British freighter Samkey reported herself at 41o 48’ N longitude, 24o W latitude on January 31. “All well.” Crew of 43.

1948, March 6: yacht Evelyn K. is found deserted in the Florida Keys; 3 persons missing

1950, April 5: the 185-foot coaster Sandra, with a cargo of DDT, disappears in passage to Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, from Savannah, Georgia.

1955, January 13: yacht Home Sweet Home, Bermuda to St. Thomas

1955, September 26: yacht Connemara IV found derelict 150 miles southeast of Bermuda.

1956, July: schooner Bounty disappears between Bimini and Miami.

1958, January 1: 44-foot yawl Revonoc vanished between Key West and Miami; 4 crew.

1960, April 16, yacht Ethel C., missing off Virginia

1961, April 5: yacht Callista III, missing Norfolk to Bahamas.

1962, schooner Evangeline

1962, November: Windfall, a 56-foot schooner left Mystic, Conn. for Bermuda; 5 crew.

1963, February 4: the 504-foot T-2 Tanker Marine Sulphur Queen, near Florida Straits; 39 crew.

1963, July 2: fishing vessel Sno Boy, between Kingston to Northeast Cay.

1964: 36-foot ketch Dancing Feathers, en route Bahamas from North Carolina.

1965, January 13: 58-foot Enchantress, 150 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina.

1965, October 28: houseboat El Gato, near Great Inagua, Bahamas.

1967, December 10: Speed Artist 5 persons; Windward Islands

1967, December 22: cabin cruiser Witchcraft, Miami Harbor; 2 persons

1969, July 4: in the Sargasso Sea freighter Cotopaxi sees derelict power yacht on automatic pilot.

1969, July 12: yacht Vagabond found derelict on edge of Sargasso Sea.

1969, August: The 2 light house keepers from Great Isaac’s Rock lighthouse, near Bimini, abandon their posts without reason.

1969, November 2: cabin cruiser Southern Cross found deserted off Cape May.

1971, October 10: 339-foot cargo vessel El Caribe, missing in Caribbean Sea.

1971, October 27: fishing yacht Lucky Edur found derelict of New Jersey; 3

1971, Christmas-time: something annihilates 53-foot yacht Ixtapa, near Florida Keys.

1973, March 21: 541-foot collier s.s. Anita vanished in building hurricane off Norfolk en route to Germany.

1973, March 23: 88-foot yacht Defiance, derelict, near Cap du Mole, St. Nicholas, Haiti; 4

1974, March: 54-foot luxury yacht Saba Bank disappears while cruising Bahamas; 4 crew.

1974, July 24: yacht Dutch Treat, Miami to Cat Cay, Bahamas.

1975, April 22: 73-foot shrimper Dawn, near Smith Shoals, Key West.

1975, June 24: yacht Meridian, bound to Bermuda from Norfolk.

1975, December 2: ocean going tug Boundless is missing in the Bahamas.

1976, April: motor sailor High Flight disappears between Bimini & Miami

1976, October: the 590-foot ore carrier Sylvia L. Ossa, about 140 miles west of Bermuda; crew of 37.

1976, December 16: 40-foot sloop with 17 people between St. Kitts and Dominica.

1977, November 20: schooner L’Avenir, Maryland to Bermuda.

1979, January 2: 66-foot tug King Co-bra, near Cape Henlopen.

1980, January 12: Sea Quest sends mysterious call, navigational equipment not working. Missing with 11 persons.

1980, April: 43-foot luxury yacht Polymer III, while cruising Bahamas; 2.

1980, July 26: 38-foot sailboat Kalia III found derelict in the Exumas, Bahamas.

1980, October 26: the 520-foot s.s. Poet, in cargo of corn, Cape Henlopen, Dl., to Port Said, Egypt.

1982, July 26: American yacht Penetration found deserted north of Sargasso Sea.

1982, August 17: British yacht found deserted in Atlantic.

1983, February 26: 44-foot Sea Lure, in group of other fishing vessels while headed toward Dry Tortugas. Later found derelict.

1984, November 5\6: the 32-foot sport fishing boat Real Fine, Freeport to Fort Lauderdale. 3 persons.

1985, February 22: 25-foot pleasure boat with 2 Canadians aboard; Freeport, to West Palm Beach.

1985, May 3: 6 persons disappear in a outboard off Surf City, North Carolina.

1992, October 27: fishing vessel Mae Doris, with 4 crew, south of Cape May.

1995, March 20: Jamanic K., Motor Vessel of 357 gt; Cape Haitien to Miami.

1996, October 14: 65-foot yacht Intrepid, 30 miles off Fort Pierce, FL; 16 missing after quick Mayday.

1997, December: 23-foot Robalo, off Virginia Beach.

1998, January 2: commercial fishing vessel Grumpy found derelict.

1998, May 1: 35-foot converted sport fisher Miss Charlotte hit by force that sucked everything off deck, then sunk; crew survived. Thought to be water spout. Off North Carolina.

1998, August 10: the Erica Lynn.

1998, November: the Carolina, off Cape May

1998, November: 74-foot Interlude disappeared during cruise to Cayman Islands.

1999, April 15: Miss Fernandina, 85-foot shrimp trawler off Flagler Beach, FL. last signaled: net caught in propellor, electrical drain, listing.

1999, April 23: Motor Vessel Genesis, 196 gt, sailed Port of Spain in cargo of 465 tons brick, water tanks and concrete slabs; at 5:30 bespoke m/v Survivor. Search for vessel was 33,100 sqm.

1999. August 5: 18-foot day cruiser found derelict except for the dog. Skipper was on a 2 hour cruise; off North Carolina.

1999, November 15: 2 person in a 22-foot day cruiser between Frying Pan Shoals and Frying Pan Light.

1999, December 27, Alyson Selene found derelict 7 miles northeast of Andros, Bahamas.

2000, April, freighter Gran Rio R disappears off West Indies.

2000, August 14, fishing vessel Hemmingway is found deserted; missing crew and captain.

2001, June 22, 2001, Tropic Bird is found derelict off Antigua.

2002, September 23, freighter Fiona R missing off West Indies en route to St. Vincent.

2003, June 18, Frank and Romina Leone of West Palm Beach, Fl. vanish with their 16 foot boat off Florida.

2003, August 3, alerts go out for sailing yacht Windhome, which left Beaufort, North Carolina for Azores June 24. Overdue and reported missing.

2003, August 25, three men vanish with a 32-foot sleek-go-fast white fiberglass vessel in the Bahamas between Exumas and Mayaguana. Owner identified as Glenroy Carey.

2003, October-November, the fishing boat What’s Left turns up capsized off Cape Canaveral with body of owner aboard. the two other passengers, the Edelmanns are missing. Boat drifted 400 miles without being detected by Coast Guard. Left port in the Gulf for fishing in Florida Keys.

2003, November 25, Peanuts Too is found deserted south of Bermuda.

2004, March 23, the missing 19-foot fishing boat owned by Glenn Jamison is found by fishing vessel Chummer about 32 miles west of Egmont Key, Florida. No trace is found of Jamison. He had left the previous Sunday for daytime fishing and did not return that night. Coast Guard reports 20 knots winds and 6 foot seas.

2004, December 21, unnamed fishing yola is found abandoned off Puerto Rico, nets deployed and anchored. Fisherman Anibal Matias missing. No trace.

Missing Aircraft

November 21, 2008

LISTS OF MISSING PLANES

The aircraft below are listed for purposes of assisting in identification. I do not necessarily believe every one is the result of unexplainable mystery.

1. 1945, December 5: The entire training flight of five Navy
TBM Avengers. Plane #s FT-28, FT-36, FT-117,
FT-3, FT-81. Crew: 14

2. 1945, December 5: PBM Martin Mariner. Off Banana
River, Florida at 28o 59’ NL 80o 25 WL. Crew:13

3. 1947, July 3: a C-54 Douglas en route from Bermuda to
Miami in cargo service. Crew: 7.

4. 1948, January 30: BSAAC Tudor IV Airliner Star Tiger
near Bermuda, northest. 29 crew and passengers, includ
ing Air Marshal Sir Arthur Coningham. GAHNP.

5. 1948, December 28: NC-16002, Douglas DC-3 passenger
airliner; south of Miami on approach to the airport
(within 50 miles). crew and passengers: 31.

6. 1949, January 17: Tudor IV Star Ariel (sister of Star
Tiger
) Bermuda for Kingston, Jamaica. Crew and
pasengers: 19. GAGRE.

7. 1954, October 30: Super Constellation, in Navy service.
Maryland for Lajes, in the Azores. Crew and passengers:
42.

8. 1956, November 9: Martin Marlin amphibious patrol
plane, about 350 miles north of Bermuda. Crew: 10.

9. 1961, October 15: an 8 engine SAC B-52 “Pogo 22” north
of Bermuda while returning from routine maneuvers.

10. 1962, January 8: Air Force KB-50 Aerial tanker. North
Carolina to Lajes, Azores. Crew: 8.

11. 1962, May 27: a C-133 Cargomaster, between Dover and
Lajes, Azores. Crew:10.

12. 1963, August 28: 2 KC-135 Stratotanker jets
mysteriously disintergrate over the Sargasso Sea,
enroute back to Miami from refueling near Bermuda.
Crew: 10 total.

13 1963, September 22: another C-133 Cargomaster; Dover
for the Azores. Crew: 10.

14. 1964, February 8: Piper Apache between Grand Bahama
Island and West Palm Beach, Florida. 4 persons.
N2157P

15. 1964, December 5: Cessna 140 with 2 persons; off New
Smyrna Beach, Florida.
N81089

16. 1965, June 5: a C-119 “Flying Boxcar”; Miami to Grand
Turk. Crew: 10. Was within 100 miles of Grand Turk.

17. 1965, September 15: Beechcraft c18s, with 3 persons,
near St. Thomas, VI, around 7:26 P.M.
N8063H

18. 1965, October 31: Cessna 182 somewhere between
Marathon Key and Key West, Florida. 2 persons.
N4010D

19. 1965, December 6: Ercoupe F01; between Fort
Lauderdale and West End, Grand Bahama. 2 persons.
N99660

20. 1965, December 29: a Piper Cherokee; South Caicos for
San Juan. 3 persons.
N6077P

21. 1966, April 5: a converted cargo B-25; Fort Lauderdale
to Aruba.
N92877

22. 1966, September 20: Tampa to Baton Rouge; Piper
Commanche. 2 persons. (see arguments on shape)

N7090P

23. 1967, January 11: Chase YC-122; between Fort
Lauderdale and Bimini in the Bahamas. 4 Persons.
N122E

24. 1967, January 14: a Beechcraft Bonanza near Key
Largo.
N7210B 4 persons.

25. 1967, January 17: Piper Cherokee en route St. Thomas
from San Juan.
N4129P

26. 1967, July 2: near Mayaguez, PR, a Cherokee. 4
persons.
N5100W

27. 1967, August 6: between Miami & Bimini; Piper
Cherokee. 3 persons.
N8165W

28. 1967, October 3: Cherokee; Great Inagua for San Juan.
N3775K

29. 1967, November 8: Cessna 182; George Town, Great
Exuma and Nassau. 4 persons.
N7121E

30. 1967, November 22: Cherokee near Cat Island,
Bahamas. 4 persons.
N9443J

31. 1968, May 29: Cessna 172 near Grand Turk. 2 persons.
N1483F

32. 1968, July 8: between Grand Bahama & West Palm
Beach; Cessna 180. 2 persons.
N944MH

33. 1969, January 5: Piper Comanche between Pompano
Beach, FL & North Carolina. 2 persons.
N8653P

34. 1969, February 15: Beechcraft 95-c55 en route Miami
from Georgia.
N9490S

35. 1969, March 8: big Douglas DC-4 in cargo service;
after leaving the Azores. Crew: 3.
N3821

36. 1969, March 22: a Beechcraft between Kingston,
Jamaica & Nassau. 2 persons.
N609R

37. 1969, June 6: Cessna 172 between Grand Turk &
Caicos Island. 2 persons.
N8040L

38. 1969, June 29: a B-95 Beechcraft Executive; Great
Inagua for San Juan.
N590T

39. 1969, August 3: Piper PA-22; West Palm Beach to
Albion, New Jersey. 2 persons.
N8971C

40. 1969, October 11: Pilattus-Brittan-Norman Islander;
Great Inagua for Puerto Rico. 2 persons.
N852JA

41. 1970, January 17: Piper Comanche; between Nassau &
Opa Locka, FL. 2 persons.
N9078P

42. 1970, July 3: between Maiquetia, Venesuela & San
Juan, PR. Cessna 310G. 6 persons.
N1166T

43. 1970, November 23: Piper Comanche between West
Palm Beach & Kingston, Jamaica. 3 persons.
N9346P

44. 1971, March 20: a Cessna 177b with pilot en route
Andros Island from Miami at 3:18 P.M.
N30844

45. 1971, July 26: Horizon Hunter Club’s rental; near
Barbados. 4 persons.

46. 1971, September 10: Phantom II F-4E Jet; on routine
maneuvers 82 miles south of Miami. 2 pilots.

47. 1971, December 21: Cessna 150j with pilot after leaving
Pompano Beach; destination unknown.
N61155

48. 1972, October 10: Super Constellation between Miami
& Santo Domingo. 4 crew.
N564E

49. 1973, March 28: Cessna 172 after leaving West Palm
Beach, FL, with pilot.
N7050T

50. 1973, May 25: a Navion A16 between Freeport and
West Palm Beach. 2 persons.
N5126K

51. 1973, August 10: Beechcraft Bonanza between Fort
Lauderdale & Marsh Harbour, Bahamas. 4 persons.
N7956K

52. 1973, August 26: after departing Viaquez, PR; Cessna
150. 3 persons.
N50143

53. 1973, December 20: a Lake Amphibian between
Nassau and Bimini. (near Bimini). 3 persons.
N39385

54. 1974, February 10: pilot and his Cessna 414 vanish
after leaving treasure Cay, Bahamas.
N8103Q

55. 1974, February 10: that night a Pilattus -Brittan-
Norman Islander with pilot and co-pilot disappear at
7:31 P.M. on approach St. Thomas.
N864JA

56. 1974, July 13: Piper PA-32 between West Palm Beach &
Walker Cay, Bahamas.
N83CA

57. 1974, August 11: Beech K35 Bonanza after departing
Pompano Beach, FL. for Philadelphia. 2 persons.
N632Q

58. 1975, February 25: Piper PA-30; Greensboro, NC. to
Freeport, GBI; pilot only.
N414DG

59. 1975, May 2: Cessna “Skymaster”; Fort Lauderdale
area.
N86011

60. 1975, July 28: Cessna 172; vicinity Fort Lauderdale. 1
N8936V

61. 1975, December 9: Cessna 172; St. Croix to St. Kitts. 1;
N5182R

62. 1976, June 4: Beech D50; Pahokee, FL., to Dominican
Republic; 2.
N1157

63. 1976, August 8: Piper PA-28; Vera Cruz, Mexico to
Brownsville, TX; 1. (See Q&A Arguments on shape)
N6377J

64. 1976, October 24: Beech E-50; Opa Locka, FL. to Grand
Turk Island.
N5665D

65. 1976, December 28: Piper PA-23; Anguilla to Beef
Island; 6.
N4573P

66. 1978, February 22: a KA-6 Navy attack bomber
vanished from radar 100 miles off Norfolk en route
U.S.S. John F. Kennedy; 2.

67. 1978, March 25: Aero Commander 680; Opa Locka-
Imokalee, FL. to Freeport, Grand Bahama; 2.
N128C

68. 1978, April 27: Ted Smith 601; Pompano Beach to
Panama City, FL.; 1.
N555BU

69. 1978, April 30: Cessna 172; Dillon, SC., to unknown; 1.
N1GH

70. 1978, May 19: Piper PA-28 Fort Pierce to Nassau; 4.
N47910

71. 1978, May 26: Beech 65; Port-au-Prince to Bahamas; 2.
N809Q

72. 1978, July 18: Piper PA-31; Santa Marta, Col. to
Port-au- Prince; 2.
N689WW

73. 1978, September 21: Douglas DC-3; Fort Lauderdale to
Havana; 4.
N407D

74. 1978, November 3: Piper PA-31; St. Croix to St.
Thomas; 1.
N59912 (right off St. Thomas)

75. 1978, November 20: Piper PA-23; De Funiak Springs to
Gainsville, FL.; 4.
N54615

76. 1979, January 11: Beech A23A; Opa Locka to St.
Thomas; 2.
N925RZ

77. 1979, April 2: Beech E18s; Fort Lauderdale to Cat
Island, Bahamas; 1.
N4442

78. 1979, April 24: Piper PA-28R; Fort Lauderdale to
Nassau; 4.
N7480J

79. 1979, June 30: Cessna 150J; St. Croix to St. Thomas; 2.
N60936

80. 1979, September 9: Cessna 182; New Orleans to
Pensacola, Florida. 3 persons.
N2183R

81. 1979, October 4: Aero Commander 500; Andros Island
to West Palm Beach, FL.; pilot;
N3815C

82. 1979, October 27: Piper PA-23; Montego Bay, Jamaico
to Nassau; pilot.
N13986

83. 1979, November 19: Beech D50b; Delray Beach, FL to
to Key West; 1.
N1706

84. 1979, December 21: Piper PA-23; Aguadilla to South
Caicos Island; 4 persons.
N1435P

85. 1980, February 11: Beech 58; St. Thomas to unknown;
only pilot aboard; reported stolen.
N9027Q

86. 1980, May 19: Lear Jet; West Palm Beach to New
Orleans; 2.
N25NE

87. 1980, June 28; Erco 415-D; Santo Domingo, DR., to San
Juan, PR; 2 persons. Pilot reported UFO before
disappearing.
N3808H

88. 1981, January 6: Beech c35; Bimini to Nassau; 4
persons
N5805C

89. 1982, July 5: Piper PA-28R-201T; Nashville to Venice,
FL.; 4.
N505HP

90. 1982, September 28: Beech H35; Marsh Harbour to
Fort Pierce, FL.; 2.
N5999

91. 1982, October 20: Piper PA-31; Anguilla to ST.
Thomas, VI. 8 persons. Charter Service.
N777AA

92. 1982, November 5: Beech 65-B80; Fort Lauderdale to
Eleuthera Island, Bahamas; 3 persons.
N1HQ

93. 1983, October 4: a Cessna T-210-J; Andros Town,
Bahamas to Fort Pierce, FL.; 3 persons.
N2284R

94. 1983, November 20: Cessna 340A disappeared near
Orangeville, Fl.; pilot.
N85JK

95. 1984, March 12: a Piper between Key West and
Clearwater, Florida; 4 persons.
N39677

96. 1984, March 31: Cessna 402b between Fort
Lauderdale and Bimini; 6 persons.
N44NC

97. 1984, December 23: Aeronca 7AC between Cross City,
Florida and Alabama; pilot.
N81947

98. 1985, January 14: a Cessna 337 in Atlantic northeast
of Jacksonville; 4 persons.
N505CX

99. 1985, May 8: Cessna 210k; Miami to Port-au-Prince,
Haiti; pilot.
N9465M

100. 1985, July 12: Piper between Nassau and Opa Locka;
4 persons.
N8341L

101. 1985, August 3: a Cessna 172; somewhere near Fort
Meyers, FL.; pilot. ??

102. 1985, September 8: a Piper northeast of Key West at
10:08 P.M. en route from Fort Lauderdale; 2 persons.
N5488W

103. 1985, October 31: Piper at 8:29 A.M. ; between
Sarasota, FL. and Columbus, Georgia; pilot.
N24MS

104. 1986, March 26: a Piper en route from Miami to West
End or Freeport, GBI.; 6 persons.
N3527E

105. 1986, August 3: A Twin Otter charter, around St.
Vincent; 13 persons.

106. 1987, May 27: a Cessna 402c; between Palm Beach,
FL. and Marsh Harbour, Great Abaco,Bahamas; 1.
N2652B

107. 1987, June 3: a Cessna 401; Freeport to Crooked
Island; 4 persons.
N7896F

108. 1987, December 2: Cessna 152; La Romana to nearby
San Juan; pilot.
N757EQ

109. 1988, February 7: a Beechcraft over the Caribbean
Sea; 4 persons.
N844G

110. 1989, February 6: a Piper; after departing
Jacksonville, Florida; pilot despondent. 1.
N6834J

111. 1990, January 24: Cessna 152 on instructional flight;
near West Palm Beach, FL. 2 persons.
N4802B

112. 1990, June 5: Piper; St. Maarten to St. Croix; pilot.
N7202F

113. 1990, August 10: Piper; between Sebastian, FL. and
Freeport, GBI.; 4 persons.
N6946D. Body found off
Virginia.

114. 1991, April 24: Piper Comanche; off Florida; pilot.
N8938P

115. 1991, May 30: near Long Boat Key; Piper signalled
directional gyro not working; spun into ocean; 2.
N6376P

116. 1991, October 31: Grumman Cougar jet; over Gulf of
Mexico; vanished on ascent while on radar; 2.
N24WJ

117. 1993, September 30: Within Miami sector; Cessna
152, with only pilot on board.
N93261

118. 1994, August 28: Piper PA-32; Treasure Cay,
Bahamas to Fort Pierce; 2 persons.
N69118

119. 1994, September 19: Piper PA-23; over Caribbean; 5.
N6844Y

120. 1994, December 25: Piper PA-28; unknown; over
Florida; pilot.
N5916V

121. 1996, May 2: Aero Commander; Atlantic/Caribbean;
vanished with 3 in charter service.
N50GV

122. 1998, August 19: Piper PA-28; Atlantic\Caribbean; 4.
N25626

123. 1999. May 12, Aero Commander N6138X; near Nassau
only pilot aboard.

124. 2001, October 27, Cessna 172, after leaving
Winterhaven, Florida; only pilot aboard.

125. 2002, September 6, Piper Pawnee, southeast of
Nassua, Bahamas; only pilot on board.
N59684

History

November 18, 2008
Bermuda Triangle

Bermuda Triangle

“The region involved, a watery triangle bounded roughly by Florida, Bermuda, and Puerto Rico, measures less than a thousand miles on any one side.”
   . . .So George X. Sand introduced the Triangle to his readers in October 1952 in a short article for Fate magazine, entitled “Sea Mystery at our Back Door.”

 
Sand’s article recounted the latest disappearance (the Sandra in 1950) and went on to discuss some of the other recent baffling mysteries like NC16002, Star Tiger and Star Ariel, aside from devoting most of the article to Flight 19.
   The Triangle remained a colloquial expression throughout the 1950s, employed by locals when another disappearance or unexplained crash happened. 
By the early 1960s, it had acquired the name The Deadly Triangle. In his 1962 book, Wings of Mystery, author Dale Titler also devoted pages in Chapter 14— “The Mystery of Flight 19”— to recounting the most recent incidents of disappearances and even began to ponder theories, such as electromagnetic anomalies and the ramifications of Project Magnet. His book would set the temper for Triangle  discussions thereafter. (Just in April 1962 Allan W. Eckert had written a sensational piece in the American Legion Magazine on Flight 19 ((“The Mystery of the Lost Patrol”)) which introduced some of the most popular but erroneous dialogue purported coming from Flight 19, including lines like the ocean looks strange, all the compasses are going haywire, and that they could not make out any directions, “everything is strange.” This became a may pole for electromagnetic discussions).
   However, popularity on the subject was beginning to spread beyond the area of the Atlantic seaboard. But the moniker “Deadly Triangle” contained absolutely no geographic reference in it— in other words  “Deadly Triangle” could be anywhere.
   Then in February 1964 Vincent Gaddis wrote an article for Argosy Magazine. The article was little different from others, though it added a few more recent cases like Marine Sulphur Queen. However, it was his title that finally clinched with the public: “The  Deadly Bermuda Triangle.” Adding “Bermuda” finally materialized the location for everybody, though Gaddis clarified “in and about this area” many have disappeared.
   In his popular 1965 book Invisible Horizons, Gaddis devoted chapter 13 to  “The Triangle of Death.” The concept of the Bermuda Triangle was spreading rapidly.
   Ironically, the first book published devoted to the subject was entitled Limbo of the Lost (1969) by John Spencer, in which he proposed the area had no real shape at all and elaborately tried to include the Gulf of Mexico as well as New Jersey. It sold in limited quantities, but was later reproduced in  paperback in the early 1970s and did well.
   Dozens of magazine and newspaper articles came out in the early ‘70s, each author offering a general shape. Richard Winer proposed “The Devil’s Triangle” and extended it nearly to the Azores near Portugal. Ivan Sanderson was sure it was an oblong shape centered almost entirely north of Bermuda.
   But no book sold as well as Charles Berlitz’s 1974 bestseller, The Bermuda Triangle. Selling way over 5,000,000 copies in hardback, it became a phenomenon. Berlitz also cautioned about the exact shape, as had the others. But to this day Bermuda Triangle is deferred to for the same reason “Deadly Triangle” failed—there is simply no other name that calls to mind the general area as does Bermuda Triangle.